Seat Ateca SUV Forum banner
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone,

I'll likely be taking the plunge at some stage this year for the Ateca. I'll definitely be going for one of the TDi DSG engines, and most likely in the Xcellence trim. I'm torn as to whether I should go for the 150 PS "two wheel drive", or the 190 PS 4Drive. I live in Northern Ireland and will not be offroading, though there'll be plenty of country road driving and some driving in snow over the winter months. At a difference of almost £3,000, it seems hard to justify the 4Drive, but I guess I was wondering if there might be any pros or cons I haven't considered. Anyone have any opinions to offer?

Thanks,
B
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
118 Posts
I do over 40% of my mileage on motorways but also quite a few miles on narrow country lanes and on the face of it 2WD would be fine but I have for the last few cars gone for a 4WD. I've found that during heavy rain the 4WD feels much more planted and secure on a motorway as does driving on the country lanes. It's matter of personal choice but maybe think back over your last few years driving when you might have felt that the car was less than secure under not perfect driving conditions? Both of my last two 4WD cars, Yeti's, were changed after 3 years and these I've PX'd as part of the new car deal, in both these cases I've got over 50% as a trade in, so the depreciation has been more than acceptable.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Having had a RAV and then a Tig both four wheel drive I have found, as Ernie mentioned, has been excellent.... In fact when I changed the RAV to the Tig the dealer told me he wouldn't want a two wheel drive RAV in stock! I think most people expect the Tig to be four wheel drive. It was no contest when I bought the Yeti... It had to be 4x4. Ok most of the time you don't really need it but it's nice to be so sure footed BUT when the snow comes I know I can get to hospital etc with no real worries. Yes there is a fuel difference but I get 40 in town and 50 on a run in a Yeti automatic so I don't worry!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Welcome to the forum Brian. Ernie and Geoff are right to say that a 4WD feels more 'planted'. However having owned both 4 and 2 wheel drive cars I've decided that having the appropriate tyres is more important than the number of driven wheels. Since having my 4WD Octavia Scout 6 years ago I have had a Fabia estate and a Yeti, both of which had summer/winter tyres. The winter tyres were a revelation and both cars are very sure-footed on rainy or snowy roads. Running costs are, in my experience, noticeably reduced for 2WD. Changing the tyres/wheels over twice a year is a bit of a faff - so I am looking to have All-season tyres fitted to my next new car from day 1. The Ateca 17" wheels have 215/55 R 17 tyres which are available in Michelin CrossClimates and which get very good reviews.

If you go on rough country roads a lot or on grass regularly for any reason, 4WD is worth considering. Otherwise consider the tyres!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
334 Posts
Never considered it myself, mainly due to up front cost. I am literally just a town driver, with the odd jaunt up the motorway. That's why I go for the small petrols.

If I had the money though the added security in awful weather would be a benefit. Luckily snow and ice is a rarity where I live, but having experienced going down an icey hill sideways one particularly awful winter (albeit in a 10 year old corsa as a 21 year old) I can fully understand why people would tick that 4wd option if you face those conditions yearly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for your thought-out responses! It'll be a while before I make the order, so I definitely have time to think about it, but I'm leaning towards the 4WD after reading what you guys have said. It's a fair bit extra up front, but that feeling of security sounds like it could be worth the extra cost...especially if we get snowfall like the last couple of years.

Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
118 Posts
I do some frequent trips to Derbyshire, at various times of the year. We've sat looking out on a cool but sunny winter day only to see it turn within minutes into a cold wind driven snow field. Then it's nice to know that you've got a stable set of wheels under your car. As per rkenny's comments I do fit winter wheels (rims and tyres) which gives added security but again I'll probably go down the Michelin Cross Climate route with the new car. If you decide to save the cash and stick with 2WD then seriously consider winter wheels or changing the tyres to Cross Climates. There's no doubt that good tyres can make an enormous difference to a cars stability in wet, cold conditions. Sorry if this is teaching to the converted but there is confusion about winter tyres, they are not snow tyres but may be snow rated, and start to work better than summer tyres below 10oC and are significantly better at 7oC and below. The Cross Climates are summer tyres but rated for winter use there are loads of YouTube videos showing how they perform they show they are almost as good as summer and winter tyres and better than All Weather. Currently available in 17" but due this year in 18" and 19". You might also want to look on Youtube for4WD with summer tyres 'v' 2WD with winter tyres in cold conditions or going up snow slopes etc. Apologies if this is off sunject.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Two other points to keep in mind .... the 4wd drive versions have a marginally smaller boot ( 485 litres v 510 litres I think). I don't know how this will impact on the dimensions of the boot, whether it results in a slightly higher floor or if you lose capacity behind/around the wheel arch intrusions. On the plus side the 4wd versions have a more sophisticated rear suspension set up which should ride/handle better. I think all the pre-production reviews were on 4wd versions so you might to delay your decision until you see some reviews of a 2dw model. Best of luck...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Even though I have 4wd I still change to winter tyres. I have an excellent tyre company who offers a "Tyre Hotel" service. They store them for free and charge £15 per wheel to swap, replace the valve and balance each wheel. I use the alloys that are standard but keep them well waxed all year and rewax just before winter. I did look at steel wheels but to be honest I have never had any corrosion problems using the standard alloys....... I do wash them off regularly to keep them salt free.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,739 Posts
GazM said:
Two other points to keep in mind .... the 4wd drive versions have a marginally smaller boot ( 485 litres v 510 litres I think). I don't know how this will impact on the dimensions of the boot, whether it results in a slightly higher floor or if you lose capacity behind/around the wheel arch intrusions. On the plus side the 4wd versions have a more sophisticated rear suspension set up which should ride/handle better. I think all the pre-production reviews were on 4wd versions so you might to delay your decision until you see some reviews of a 2dw model. Best of luck...
On depth, I invited myself to the Silverstone Fleet World show with tape measure. Checking out the back of the 4WD albeit a left hand drive European model I would say basically you loose half the depth of the lower level boot. Enough for the skinny but not for full size. Having a Altea I was concerned about how much stuff I would have to omit from the lower region of the boot which I cram around the full size spare, I expect over a half. Your subwoofer goes in the centre of the spare with the enhanced sound system. The top loading area of the Ateca is flush with the higher floor e.g. load just straight into the boot if you have the Seat Sound.

I didn't feel that the lower level cover would be strong - could be wrong. The Altea is a three if not four folding ABS material type of boarding, the Ateca was a one piece cover shown in the picture below, bit like hardboard. Maybe this wasn't a production model and the final top floor boot cover would be stronger or is made of load bearing materiel.

So no, not a higher floor, but a reduction in lower boot space to accommodate a skinny rather than a full size wheel, the balance going to the 4WD mechanics. Plastic polystyrene type of moulding around the spare wheel with gaps for the tools to go in.

The actual boot height to the shelf from the upper floor is pretty high, over 50 cm - needed that measurement for my rigid chiller box. My impression build quality good, seating on this Xcellence good, nice bucket seats although this was in cloth for the European market not leather.

If you have read my stuff on that other forum I have been preoccupied to understand the sat navigation and media formats ☺. Think I'm happy on that now. Going to go for a full spec 4WD since I'm intending to move to the countryside - Wales way, where it snows and have in the past travelled through Germany / Luxembourg / Belgium on those annual Xmas gaunts with sometimes throw up thick snow in difficult conditions, so my thinking is I will take a hit on price and economy but have more assurance of not getting stuck or sliding off the road. My 2 WD Altea DSG isn't good on snow, it just slides on a slight incline just to get in a drive. Tyres and all that but not gripping all round is also a factor.

4WD back end:


Skiny spare:


Boot closed:
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top