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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Picking up our car on Saturday & wondered if anyone has any tips for driving an automatic? Hubby has never driven an automatic & in 27 years of driving I drove an automatic about 18 years ago for acouple of weeks! Our sales guy is going to take us out for a drive in our car when we collect, but any tips much appreciated!

Thanks in advance!
 
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My only tip would be this: just forget that you have a left leg, and you'll be fine. Or you can just tie your left leg to something like the seat rail with the shuelaces for the first few trips. :D I think that is the most common problem on beginners. They tend to press the non-existing clutch pedal, ending up using breaks - hard.
 

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I agree with the left leg thing. My first experience using an auto was in the states and my leg hit the break hard the first few times. So make sure your left leg is tucked away and you'll be fine
 

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OK.
In jammed traffic, take the lever to manual mode.
When accelerating against a steep hill/road, again use the manual mode.
By this way, you will prevent the gearbox to heat up excessively in these conditions.
Always apply the electronic hand brake before taking the lever to Park (P).
Try not to press hard on the accelerator pedal to launch suddenly. This increases wear and tear.
It's quite hefty to repair or change the DSG gearbox parts, so care is needed and it'll serve you well. Don't just forget it works with dual clutches so just like the stickshift cars, these clutches will need replacement when time or km is due.
Enjoy your Ateca :)
 
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Bagheera said:
OK.
In jammed traffic, take the lever to manual mode.
When accelerating against a steep hill/road, again use the manual mode.
By this way, you will prevent the gearbox to heat up excessively in these conditions.
That does not make any sense to me. :?: Manual mode? Why? Manual mode prevents automatic gear change, nothing more. How does it prevent the gearbox from heating up in jammed traffic?
 

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Tet70 said:
Bagheera said:
OK.
In jammed traffic, take the lever to manual mode.
When accelerating against a steep hill/road, again use the manual mode.
By this way, you will prevent the gearbox to heat up excessively in these conditions.
That does not make any sense to me. :?: Manual mode? Why? Manual mode prevents automatic gear change, nothing more. How does it prevent the gearbox from heating up in jammed traffic?
Because despite some technical iterations, DSG gearbox is still delicate upon these conditions. For the short term, most of you may think "I paid hundreds of bucks why would I use the manual mode?", however for the long term and for the sake of the health of the gearbox, this is recommended. During a heavy traffic jam, in the Auto mode, the gearbox rapidly goes to 2nd gear and this is repeatedly from 1 to 2, 1 to 2, in heavy traffic. That causes heat and leads to failure in the future if driven this way. Mechatronics unit is the first to go unfortunately...
 

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Why would you apply the parking brake manually? It is applied automatically when you select "P".

I never use manual mode - I always use the paddles when I need a manual change - you can do this even though you are in Auto mode. If you do not make another manual change for a minute or so, it reverts back to auto or just holding the + pedal for 2 seconds will force it back to auto. It is much easier than using kick down when you want to overtake quickly.

If you want to see how a DSG box works and understand it better try these links.

http://forums.vwvortex.com/showthread.php?5989734-How-to-Play-The-DSG-Game-and-Win-DSG-Driving-Tips-and-Tricks
 

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Fred99 said:
Why would you apply the parking brake manually? It is applied automatically when you select "P".

I never use manual mode - I always use the paddles when I need a manual change - you can do this even though you are in Auto mode. If you do not make another manual change for a minute or so, it reverts back to auto or just holding the + pedal for 2 seconds will force it back to auto. It is much easier than using kick down when you want to overtake quickly.

If you want to see how a DSG box works and understand it better try these links.

http://forums.vwvortex.com/showthread.php?5989734-How-to-Play-The-DSG-Game-and-Win-DSG-Driving-Tips-and-Tricks
When you don't apply the parking brake before, you'll leave all the weight of the car to a small locking part within gearbox lever. P mode is just a click. You ensure your car to a full stop when you engage the parking brake and you just relieve the P mode doing all the thing by itself.

Thank you for the links by the way, I appreciate it. Not offended. :)
 

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Bagheera said:
Fred99 said:
Why would you apply the parking brake manually? It is applied automatically when you select "P".
When you don't apply the parking brake before, you'll leave all the weight of the car to a small locking part within gearbox lever. P mode is just a click. You ensure your car to a full stop when you engage the parking brake and you just relieve the P mode doing all the thing by itself.
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I don't understand your theory - isn't Fred99 right in what he says?

Before selecting 'P', you must have your foot on the brake pedal, so the foot brake is holding the weight of the car, not just the small locking part. And then when you move the gearlever in to 'P', the park brake / auto hold whatever engages. At what point will the car be held only by the gearbox?
 

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my 2p... based on what I've experienced:
If you don't have auto hold on, putting the gearbox into Park doesn't automatically engage the parking brake. All it does is activate the 'parking pawl' inside the gearbox, which is a small metal cog segment which engages to lock the transmission. You then turn the engine off and with the parking brake disengaged, the parking pawl is the only thing holding the vehicle stationary. On a flat level surface that's probably fine, but any kind of incline means the full weight of the car is being held stationary by a little chunk of expensive metal in your very expensive gearbox. This is generally regarded as a Bad Thing, because if that parking pawl breaks due to the load it will require a full teardown of the gearbox to fix it.

If auto hold is on, turning the engine off causes the parking brake to automatically engage, taking the load off the gearbox parking pawl and transferring it to the braking system which is designed for such loads.
 

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Golfmk56 said:
Bagheera said:
Fred99 said:
Why would you apply the parking brake manually? It is applied automatically when you select "P".
When you don't apply the parking brake before, you'll leave all the weight of the car to a small locking part within gearbox lever. P mode is just a click. You ensure your car to a full stop when you engage the parking brake and you just relieve the P mode doing all the thing by itself.
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I don't understand your theory - isn't Fred99 right in what he says?

Before selecting 'P', you must have your foot on the brake pedal, so the foot brake is holding the weight of the car, not just the small locking part. And then when you move the gearlever in to 'P', the park brake / auto hold whatever engages. At what point will the car be held only by the gearbox?
Yes, the brake pedal holds the vehicle and may be sufficient on an iron flat surface but not on a slope...And as you all know, you don't just rely on the foot break, right? On any car? Manual or auto? Consider this, you don't apply the hand brake, the car is on Park, someone smashes your car. Apart from the obvious body damage, where do you think another damage might occur deep down?
 

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PaulT00 said:
my 2p... based on what I've experienced:
If you don't have auto hold on, putting the gearbox into Park doesn't automatically engage the parking brake. All it does is activate the 'parking pawl' inside the gearbox, which is a small metal cog segment which engages to lock the transmission. You then turn the engine off and with the parking brake disengaged, the parking pawl is the only thing holding the vehicle stationary. On a flat level surface that's probably fine, but any kind of incline means the full weight of the car is being held stationary by a little chunk of expensive metal in your very expensive gearbox. This is generally regarded as a Bad Thing, because if that parking pawl breaks due to the load it will require a full teardown of the gearbox to fix it.

If auto hold is on, turning the engine off causes the parking brake to automatically engage, taking the load off the gearbox parking pawl and transferring it to the braking system which is designed for such loads.
Secret Word he has: ..."only thing holding the vehicle stationary".
 

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Lizard! said:
Picking up our car on Saturday & wondered if anyone has any tips for driving an automatic? Hubby has never driven an automatic & in 27 years of driving I drove an automatic about 18 years ago for acouple of weeks! Our sales guy is going to take us out for a drive in our car when we collect, but any tips much appreciated!

Thanks in advance!
I've been driving a DSG for 12.5 years and the Ateca for four months.

There is a leg rest for your left foot, stick it on there are keep it there :). Ignore Honest John's two legged approach to driving an automatic that will cause an accident for sure....

Engage the electric parking brake on autohold, never touch it again. You don't need to, ignore all chatter on the box overheating etc. Prior to electric parking brakes and autohold you would hold the car on the brake at lights, normal auto driving. With the electric parking brake on autohold just lift your foot off the brake.

Check to see how the brake lights work on autohold. Mine go out. Manual drivers they don't but then reported on here more recently a DSG driver they stayed on. I suspect VAG changed their mind on the behaviour of the lights. It's good to know whether you are dazzling someone or not.

Then we have stop start. Manual drivers aren't effected by this since they frig with the clutch to stop the engine from stopping and have enough time for the restart whilst changing gear. DSG if it's set to on may find it distinctly dangerous in heavy traffic conditions. You can turn it off evertime you start the car if you remember or if you have nimble feet get your foot off the brake pedal within two seconds of stopping and that will keep the engine running or twitch the steering wheel. Or you can be like me and meddle with the car's system so it's disabled on the basis that the feature is just too dangerous and poorly implemented by VAG. Unmedle it when you get the car serviced. A technical bent and it's easy.

A man of my heart here, there are a lot of us about. This blog post nicely covers the issue.

http://blog.videgro.net/2017/01/volkswagen-disable-automatic-start-stop-system/

It can be done with the Obdeleven as well.
 

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Test drove the 1.4 dsg today and was quietly impressed. Vs my mk6 golf gti dsg, it was more refined and generally pulled fine in normal town driving. No chance to extend it, but I'm not interested in that anymore.

The one thing that did catch me out with the dsg was when I put it in reverse to park, released footbrake and.... nothing. ie no instant creep back which I miss. Had to disable the autohold to get it to move. One button press more than I'd like to be honest.

The stop start worked pretty quickly and with little noise so that seemed fine.
 

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If you are used to an older automatic which creeps, you are better off disabling auto hold but remember that if you do then the parking brake has to be put on manually.

I tend to use it as normal until I need to manoeuvre such as backing out of my drive or parking.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Thank-you for all your tips & advice. Picked up the Ateca today & hubby & I shared the 150 mile drive home, which was fab for getting used to the DSG auto - we did have one funny moment though & took us 20 mins to get out of the car park after one of our stops as forgot we have to have the foot on the brake to press the stop/start button!
 

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Fred99 said:
If you are used to an older automatic which creeps, you are better off disabling auto hold but remember that if you do then the parking brake has to be put on manually.

I tend to use it as normal until I need to manoeuvre such as backing out of my drive or parking.
Creep operates a bit different. It will creep but the use of autohold means when you are completely stationary it's like having the parking brake on. Touch accelerator, brake off and you are back to creeping.

Creep is handy when you don't want to brake to a stop by definition of creep. Normally without the electronic parking brake you would hold an automatic on the brake, foot off and back to creep. Autohold instead of keeping your foot on the brake it's "autoholding" so you can rest your foot, touch the accelerator gently and off you go again. Gently if you want to resume creeping. Least in the TDI DSG you get this so suspect the TSI is much the same.

I'd say just a different style of pedal action when stationary with autohold but will creep when moving. Manual drivers tend not to creep due to stalling the engine so tend to stop / start in queues. Creeping does allow engine braking and changing down as you go into a creep. Expressed another way, you use engine braking coming up to a junction with the DSG doing the changing down, then go into the creep.

I keep autohold on all the time except when I parked it up for a month and had it blocked.
 

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Lizard! said:
Thank-you for all your tips & advice. Picked up the Ateca today & hubby & I shared the 150 mile drive home, which was fab for getting used to the DSG auto - we did have one funny moment though & took us 20 mins to get out of the car park after one of our stops as forgot we have to have the foot on the brake to press the stop/start button!
Ah that one is ignition without starting :). Wasn't aware of that feature till recently, powers up but no start (like the first click if it had a key). It has its uses for certain things, one is for the TDI2.0 after topping up with AdBlue and the manual says, leave for 30 seconds before ignition or words to that effect, means press the button but don't put your foot on the brake.
 
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Tell said:
Autohold instead of keeping your foot on the brake it's "autoholding" so you can rest your foot, touch the accelerator gently and off you go again. Gently if you want to resume creeping. Least in the TDI DSG you get this so suspect the TSI is much the same.
Creep effect on the traditional automatic gearbox is caused by the torque converter, which DSG doesn't have. On those, torque is constantly transmitted, there is no clutch to disengage engine from gearbox. DSG has clutches, which makes it a little bit different. Clutch can be fully engaged, disengaged or partially engaged. Clutch being partially engaged gives the same kind of creep effect as a torque converter. DSG models with wet clutches do this, but the 7-speed DSG with dry clutches (the one they use in 2-wheel drive Atecas with petrol engine) just refuses to do it - it will not creep no matter what you do. That is intentional behaviour, to spare the dry clutches from overheating.
 

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Sorry, but you are wrong. My 1.4 creeps perfectly with AH off.
 
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